Lumu IPhone Light meter review

Lumu IPhone Light meter review

Lumu

Ahhh now here we have it! An external IPhone light meter! This little device plugs right into the headphone jack of an iPhone, you have to download the Lumu app which then shows Aperture, Shutter speed then ISO you simply use it like a normal light meter, putting it next to your subject or pointing it in the direction of which you are shooting press measure then it shows all the information.

App

The light meter it self is very snappy you simply press the button and it does it for every single aperture on that ISO. I have encountered one little issue though after you get used to the app and actually take a photo I noticed it was slightly underexposed you can calibrate it inside the app although it does not really explain how to do it perfectly.

Using the Lumu

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Using the cameras built in light meter

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These photos are straight from the JPG there has been no editing of any kind in these. The difference is not huge and its nothing too major that a little photoshop can’t fix. The price of this Device is $150 US Dollars. In my opinion it is worth it if you wish to have a small yet useful light meter. Problem is when your phone dies you have no light meter, other light meters batteries last way longer then an iPhone battery will which makes them more reliable.

So i then tried this in direct sunlight, F4 with the Nikon 30-110 lens I must say it REALLY messed up on this one, underexposing it majorly, now could this be user error? it could be! I have only used this a little bit, but imagine I was shooting out of an old TLR and I thought all my images were coming out correctly, when all I’m actually doing is wasting film and money for images that may be unusable!

Direct sun Lumu

Lumu scott

Direct sun aperture priority mode

Camera Lumu

The lump always seems to underexpose it and the in camera meters have slightly over exposed this photo, it seems you just have to mess with it a little bit, figure out what you are looking for. If you are using strictly analog I recommend getting a proprietary light meter, however if you shoot mostly digital but film sometimes I strongly recommend this Lumu you can tweak it in the settings if you know how too, another good feature of this is you can measure light intensity in the room at a constant scan rate. For the price though this product isn’t too bad it is way better than spending $400 plus dollars on a light meter if you don’t rely on one all the time. It is pocketable and you can even wear it around your neck with the included necklace.

Necklace

Necklace

If you are thinking about purchasing one of these Id look to see if it will work with your Device, I have a Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 and it won’t register even though I have the app. Its made for iPhones more than android devices.

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